Full Programme

Watch the videos of the Online Science Days in our Mediatheque.

Download our programme here!

Sunday, 28 June 2020

Afternoon

Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings in a Nutshell

Type

Conversation

 

Time

15.20 – 16.00 CEST, 40 min

Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings in a Nutshell in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

  • Countess Bettina Bernadotte, President of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings
  • Moderator: Karan Khemka, Director of Global Education Companies and Institutions, United Kingdom & Singapore

Abstract

Learn more about the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings: Their history, the people behind it, how to participate, and what’s in store for 2021.

Welcome & Kick-Off

Type

Social Event

 

Time

16.00 – 16.30 CEST, 30 min

Welcome & Kick-Off in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

  • Countess Bettina Bernadotte, President of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings
  • Anja Karliczek, Federal Minister of Education and Research, Germany
  • Bernd Sibler, Bavarian State Minister for Science and the Arts, Germany

Abstract

Official Opening of the Online Science Days

International Scientific Collaboration

Type

Debate

 

Time

16.30 – 18.00 CEST, 90 min

International Scientific Collaboration in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Yeka Aponte, Chief of the Department of Neuronal Circuits and Behavior Unit at the National Institute on Drug Abuse, USA
  • Barry C. Barish, Caltech – California Institute of Technology, USA
  • Toby Brown, Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Department of Physics & Astronomy at McMaster University, Canada
  • David J. Gross, Chancellor’s Chair Professor of Theoretical Physics oft Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California, Santa Barbara, USA
  • Sir Konstantin S. Novoselov, Department of Materials Science & Engineering at the National University of Singapore, Singapore
  • Sir Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Structural Studies Division at MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, United Kingdom
  • Moderator: Jan-Martin Wiarda, Journalist & Freelance Writer

Abstract

When this debate topic was first conceived for the regular programme of the 70th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting, the focus was on the most recent impactful incident for scientific collaboration: Brexit. Accompanied by larger trends towards more nationalistic political (and thus research) agendas, and more isolation in a growing number of countries world-wide, these challenges alone would have been sufficient to discuss the state and role of international scientific collaboration.

With the corona crisis, this debate has gained a whole new spin: Collaboration and exchange of knowledge may be the key in the race for a vaccine, and it may pave the way for a new level of open, collaborative science. Defeating this purpose are discussions about which nation should have first access to the vaccine or attempts to buy vaccine research start-ups to secure a national supply.

The panel will debate how international scientific collaboration can work in our current times: What are its pitfalls, how do they relate to political agendas, how can they be financed, how are they setup most productively?

Monday, 29 June 2020

Morning

Corona – The Role of Science in Times of Crises

Type

Debate

 

Time

06.00 – 07.30 CEST, 90 min

Corona – The Role of Science in Times of Crisis in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Peter C. Doherty, Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Melbourne, Australia
  • Alice Fletcher-Etherington, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research at the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
  • Michael Levitt, School of Medicine at the Department of Structural Biology at Stanford University, USA
  • Saul PerlmutterDepartment of Physics at the University of California, USA
  • Enrique Lin Shiao, Postdoctoral researcher at Doudna Lab at University of California, Berkeley, USA
  • Moderator: Adam Smith, Chief Scientific Officer of Nobel Media AB, Sweden

Abstract

In this debate, the participants will discuss some of the scientific aspects such as virus biology, immunity, antibodies, antiviral drugs or mathematical models for virus spread.

More importantly, they will also take a step back and analyse the role of science: how has it influenced policy decisions, how should scientists act in debates with each other and in communication to the public, how have scientists and science been perceived by politicians, media and the general public?

Is the new role as very influential policy advisors really a welcome one? Scientists have often demanded that they need to be listened to more carefully and their advice must be taken more seriously – yet to some degree, the uncertainty and complexity of the scientific approach and the decisive answers needed in politics do not seem very compatible.

What lessons can be learned from science in times of the corona crisis for future crises, such as climate change?

Immunity

Type

Conversation

 

Time

07.30 – 08.30 CEST, 60 min

Immunity in the Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Bruce A. Beutler, Director of Center for the Genetics of Host Defense at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, USA
  • Jules A. HoffmannMolecular and Cellular Biology Institute at Université de Strasbourg, France
  • Sir Gregory P. Winter, Fellow of Trinity College, United Kingdom
  • Moderator: Adam Smith, Chief Scientific Officer of Nobel Media AB, Sweden
My Brain & Me

Type

Conversation

 

Time

08.30 – 09.30 CEST, 60 min

My Brain & Me in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Edvard I. Moser, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway
  • Erwin Neher, Membranbiophysics at Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Germany
  • Moderator: Adam Smith, Chief Scientific Officer of Nobel Media AB, Sweden

Abstract

Neurosciences is an interdisciplinary field and the two speakers of the day, Nobel Laureates in Medicine and Physiology Edvard I. Moser and Erwin Neher present two different types of scientists approaching the brain and how it works.
While Erwin Neher investigates the basic neuronal mechanisms from the view point of a biophysicist, Edvard I. Moser explores the brain from the point of view of a psychologist and asks how the brain works with respect to higher brain functions such as memory, language etc, and in this context explores networks of neurons that span large areas of the brain.
In this discussion it will be addressed where there is the intersection of these two approaches and also the significance of it for future research and the challenge of it.
Furthermore, projects like the Blue Brain Project or the Human Brain project, which aim to reconstruct the brain in silico, are discussed. 

Networking

Type

Expo & Networking

 

Time

09.30 – 10.30 CEST, 60 min

Midday

Next Gen Science I

Type

Next Gen Science

 

Time

10.30 – 11.30 CEST, 60 min

Next Gen Science Session I in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Erica Zeglio, Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden (10.30 – 10:45 CEST)
  • Mats Persson, Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden (10.45 – 11.00 CEST)
  • Malin Alsved, Physics, Lund University, Sweden (11.00 – 11.15 CEST)
  • Anna Blakney, Biology, Imperial College London, United Kingdom (11.15 – 11.30 CEST)

Abstract Titles

  • Erica Zeglio: Bio-functionalized organic electronic devices for biological interfacing
  • Mats Persson: Next-generation x-ray computed tomography for diagnosing coronavirus disease
  • Malin Alsved: Airborne viruses in hospitals during disease outbreaks
  • Anna Blakney: Self-Amplifying RNA: The Future of Globally Accessible Vaccines

 

Sciathon Results I

Type

Sciathon Results

 

Time

11.30 – 12.30 CEST, 60 min

Participants

Team member of the top three ranked projects of the Sciathon concerning the topic Capitalism after Corona: Group Abdelmageed, Group Jonelis, Group Maier

 

Topic

Capitalism after Corona

Next Gen Science II

Type

Next Gen Science

 

Time

12.30 – 13.30 CEST, 60 min

Next Gen Science Session II in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Diana Maria van Patten Rivera, Economics, University of California, Los Angeles, USA (12.30 – 12.45 CEST)
  • Sebastian Ottinger, Economics, University of California, Los Angeles, USA (12.45 – 13.00 CEST)
  • Marica Valente, Economics, German Institute for Economic Research – DIW Berlin, Germany (13.00 – 13.15 CEST)
  • Mengqiao Du, Economics, University of Mannheim, Germany (13.15 – 13.30 CEST)

Abstract Titles

  • Diana Maria van Patten Rivera: Multinationals, Monopsony and Local Development: Evidence from the United Fruit Company
  • Sebastian Ottinger: Immigrants, Industries, and Path Dependence
  • Marica Valente: When pricing waste succeeds (and fails): Understanding heterogeneous policy effects
  • Mengqiao Du: Do Counter-stereotypical Female Role Models Impact Women’s Occupational Choices?

 

 

 

Next Gen Science Expo & Networking

Type

Expo & Networking

 

Time

13.30 – 14.30 CEST, 60 min

Afternoon

Inequalities and COVID-19

Type

Talk

 

Time

14.30 – 15.30 CEST, 60 min

Inequalities and COVID-19 in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Sir Angus S. Deaton, Professor Emeritus of Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs at Princeton University, USA

Abstract

Pre-existing inequalities are shaping the course of the pandemic just as the pandemic is creating new inequalities and changing old ones. This is true both within countries—and here I focus mostly on the US, but with some attention to other countries—and between countries, where the pandemic will affect patterns of trade and international relations. In the US, we have another epidemic, of deaths of despair, separating those with a four-year college degree from those without. The pandemic will likely widen the mortality gaps between the less and more-educated, as well as their earnings gaps, already at historical highs. Poor countries are likely to suffer more than rich countries. Globalisation will slow. Income inequalities within countries are likely to rise, as markets reward those who can provide e-services of all kinds, but may narrow as globalisation retreats.

Corona: Developing-Country and International Perspectives

Type

Conversation

 

Time

15.30 – 16.30 CEST, 60 min

Corona: Developing-Country and International Perspectives

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Abhijit Banerjee, Department of Economics of MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  • Esther DufloDepartment of Economics of MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  • Michael R. Kremer, Department of Economics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, USA
  • Moderator: Romesh Vaitilingam, Media Consultant at Pira Consulting, United Kingdom

 

Abstract

The 2019 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel – often referred as the ‘Nobel Prize in Economics’ – was awarded jointly to Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo of MIT and Michael Kremer of Harvard University ‘for their experimental approach to alleviating global poverty’.
Invested in researching how to alleviate global poverty and its influence on education and health these three Laureates currently see the change to explore with their project the link between the work of epidemiologists and economists and adapt their research and project in developing countries to the current circumstances.
In this respect the idea of the Universal Ultra Base Income (UUBI) is discussed and the positive impact it may have in times of crises such as now. The three Laureates debate how the UUBI may help to stop or decelerate the spreading of COVID-19 in certain areas. Banerjee, Duflo and Kremer also discuss how a UUBI would influence different developing countries and the difference in their infrastructure which makes it harder or easier to distribute a possible UUBI in the rural areas.
Discover how these ideas can be translated from the current COVID-19 pandemic to other crises such as failing crops, locust pests or climate change in general 

Full Transprict

As this recording was shortened to fit into the programme schedule, a full transcript is available here.

Corona and the Economy: Mitigating the Crisis

Type

Debate

 

Time

16.30 – 18.00 CEST, 90 min

Corona and the Economy: Mitigating the Crisis

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Peter A. DiamondDepartment of Economics at MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  • Novaira Junaid, Economics Research at Punjab Economic Research Institute (PERI), Pakistan
  • Bengt R. HolmströmDepartment of Economics at MIT Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
  • Robert J. Shiller, Department of Economics at Yale University, USA
  • Jean Tirole, Honorary Chairman at Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), France
  • Jurgen Willems, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria
  • Moderator: Romesh Vaitilingam, Media Consultant of Pira Consulting, United Kingdom

Abstract

“I have been involved in many economic crises, including three major ones in Sweden. But I have never previously experienced such a rapid course of events and so many decisions being taken in such a short space of time.”, said the Governor of the Swedish Riksbank Stefan Ingves in a speech at the beginning of April on the Riksbank’s measures to mitigate the effects of the corona crisis on the economy.

Are we in the biggest economic crisis of modern times?

Without doubt, the lockdown has massively affected the world economy, with un¬foreseeable long-term consequences. How are different countries and regions affected? What strategies are available to best mitigate the crisis? How can companies and industries be saved best, and which role does the state and massive state support play? Does the crisis offer a chance to develop economies into a future-proof direction, considering the

These are only a few of the questions the participants of this debate will discuss.

Tuesday, 30 June 2020

Morning

Innovation by Evolution: Bringing New Chemistry to Life

Type

Talk

 

Time

06.00 – 07.00 CEST, 60 min

Innovation by Evolution: Bringing New Chemistry to Live

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Frances H. Arnold, Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at California Institute of Technology, USA

Abstract

Not satisfied with nature’s vast repertoire of chemistry, I want to create new protein catalysts and expand the space of enzyme functions. Nature’s most powerful biological design process, evolution, can be used to explore the universe of possible catalysts and move into a more sustainable future in which chemistry, including human-invented chemistry, will be genetically encoded. Using evolution to optimise existing enzymes and invent new ones allows us to circumvent our profound ignorance of how sequence encodes function.

The Politics of Climate Change

Type

Conversation

 

Time

07.00 – 08.00 CEST, 60 min

The Politics of Climate Change in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Steven ChuPhysics Department at Stanford University, USA
  • Brian P. Schmidt, Vice-Chancellor of The Australian National University, Australia
  • Moderator: Magdalena Skipper, Editor in Chief of Nature, United Kingdom

Abstract

Climate change is a global problem, which’s urgency is seemingly not understood by large fractions of the public and the policymakers.
Looking back into the 1980s a similar global crisis, the depletion of the ozone layer, could be stopped and even be reverted. How was it possible for our globalised community to react as one, and could the same mechanisms, which helped the Montreal Protocol from 1987 to be realised, be adapted for the 2015 Paris Agreement?
We learned from the Covid-19 pandemic that no country can isolate itself or build a wall. Everything is intertwined, hence we need a global political and social action to prevent the progress of climate change.
To turn the ship in this matter, the global community will need to act now and has to be persistent since it will take decades to stop and reverse the effects of climate change. But to do so we need to understand the mechanics of climate policy and how the public can sway the perspective of the current political elite.
These aspects and many more will be addressed by the Nobel Laureates in Physics Steven Chu and Brian P. Schmidt.  

Green Chemistry – Green Fuels

Type

Debate

 

Time

08.00 – 09.30 CEST, 90 min

Green Chemistry – Green Fuels in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Fatima Enam, School of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University, USA
  • Hartmut Michel, Director of Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Germany
  • Ryoji Noyori, Center for Research and Development Strategy at Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan
  • Kwadwo Owusu, Materials Science and Engineering at Wuhan University of Technology, China
  • Robert Schlögl, Managing Director of MPI for Chemical Energy Conversion, Germany
  • Moderator: Magdalena Skipper, Editor in Chief of Nature, United Kingdom

Abstract

In late April 2020, for the first time in history the oil price went negative – not the best circumstances for advancing renewable energy sources. While no one knows for sure how the oil price may affect the economy in general and carbon‐reduction measures in particular, the imminent threat of climate change has not disappeared, and neither has the need for alternatives to carbon‐based fuels and for a transition to a “green chemistry” in industry worldwide.

Finding and improving catalysts and enzymes are one key to such developments. In the mobility sector batteries are an alternative but at present it is not clear if they will become efficient and sustainable enough in the near future to replace fuels in all applications.

Which energy sources and methods (solar, biomass, nuclear, fusion etc.) are most promising?

Academic Partners Expo & Networking

Type

Expo & Networking

 

Time

09.30 – 10.30 CEST, 60 min

Academic Partners

  • Australian Academy of Science
  • Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf)
  • European Commission

Midday

Next Gen Science III

Type

Next Gen Science

 

Time

10.30 – 11.30 CEST, 60 min

Next Gen Science Session III in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Liselotte Obst-Huebl, Physics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, USA (10.30 – 10.45 CEST)
  • Bo Peng, Physics, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom (10.45 – 11.00 CEST)
  • Marie-Nicole Theodoraki, University of Ulm, Germany (11.00 – 11.15 CEST)
  • Yauhen (Eugene) Sachkou, Physics, The University of Queensland, Australia (11.30 – 11.45 CEST)

Abstract Titles

  • Liselotte Obst-Huebl: Laser-particle acceleration enables interdisciplinary research on a budget
  • Bo Peng: Designing controllable topological quantum materials for the future
  • Marie-Nicole Theodoraki: Exosomes from plasma of HNSCC patients treated with photodynamic therapy are biomarkers for epithelial-mesenchymal transition
  • Yauhen (Eugene) Sachkou: Quantum tornadoes in a superfluid droplet
Sciathon Results II

Type

Sciathon Results

 

Time

11.30 – 12.30 CEST, 60 min

Presentation of Sciathon Results for Communicating Climate Change in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Team member of the top three ranked projects of the Sciathon concerning the topic Communicating Climate Change: Group Barreda, Group Bisztray, Group Enninful

 

Topic

Communicating Climate Change

 

 

 

Next Gen Science IV

Type

Next Gen Science

 

Time

12.30 – 13.30 CEST, 60 min

Next Gen Science Session IV in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Stephanie Grimmel, Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Netherlands (12.30 – 12.45 CEST)
  • Sara Cembellin, Chemistry, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain (12.45 – 13.00 CEST)
  • Steve Doo, Biology, Leibniz-Zentrum für Marine Tropenforschung (ZMT) GmbH, Germany (13.00 – 13.15 CEST)
  • Vincent Kadiri, Chemistry, Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme, Germany (13.15 – 13.30 CEST)

 

Abstract Titles

  • Stephanie Grimmel: Automated Reaction Space Exploration – Fostering Novel Discoveries by Combining Chemistry and Computer Science
  • Sara Cembellin: Past, Present and Future of Managanese C-H Activation
  • Steve Doo: Developing interdisciplinary tools to understand how coral reefs will be impacted by climate change
  • Vincent Kadiri: Active Gene Delivery to Cells via Magnetic Nanopropellers
Next Gen Science Expo & Networking

Type

Expo & Networking

 

Time

13.30 – 14.30 CEST, 60 min

Afternoon

A New Measure: the Revolutionary Reform of the Metric System

Type

Conversation

 

Time

14.30 – 15.30 CEST, 60 min

A New Measure: the Revolutionary Reform of the Metric System in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • William D. Phillips, Laser Cooling and Trapping Group at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), USA
  • Moderator: Rainer Blatt, Professor at the Department of Experimental Physics at the University of Innsbruck, Austria

Abstract

Base unites like the meter, the second and the kilogram are used every day. And while these units seem so common, their definition is tricky. Since 20 May 2019 none of the seven base units depends anymore on something like a prototype of a kilogram or a meter but solely on natural constants. In this conversation, Nobel Laureate Bill Phillips and physicist Rainer Blatt discuss the definition of the kilogram based on the scientific achievements of the Nobel Laureates Brian D. Josephson and Klaus von Klitzing. In this conversation, both physicists will illustrate how quantum effects are used to define the kilogram, and will discuss if there is a need to redefine the base unit of time although everything seems fixed.

Batteries

Type

Talk

 

Time

15.30 – 16.30 CEST, 60 min

Batteries in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

Abstract

Lithium-ion batteries have come from an idea to dominate electrochemical energy storage. They are now in a position to enable the large-scale introduction of renewable energy, as well as electrifying transportation, which will leave a cleaner and more sustainable environment for the next generation. There are ample scientific opportunities to further improve the performance and safety. Today’s cells attain only 25% of their theoretical value. However, as the energy density is increased, the safety tends to be compromised. Examples will include: the soft TiS2 lattice, the layered oxides, LiMO2, and Li2VOPO4, a proof of concept for a two-electron transfer. These opportunities and the technical challenges that need to be overcome will be described in order to open up a discussion.

Communicating Climate Change

Type

Debate

 

Time

16.30 – 18.00 CEST, 90 min

Communicating Climate Change in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Levke Caesar, Postdoctoral researcher at the Department for Earth System Analysis at the Potsdam Institute of Climate Impact Research, Germany
  • Steven Chu, Physics Department at Stanford University, USA
  • Mario J. Molina, Centro Mario Molina para Estudios Estratégicos sobre Energía y Medio Ambiente A.C., Mexico
  • Brian P. Schmidt, Vice-Chancellor of The Australian National University, Australia
  • Georg Schütte, General-Secretary of the Volkswagen-Foundation, Germany
  • Moderator: Brian Malow, Science Communicator, USA

Abstract

The coronavirus notwithstanding, climate change may be the most serious challenge society is facing in the 21st century – at least it is the most serious environmental challenge. The basic science is very clear, and the consensus among scientists almost unanimous, even though climate is a very complex system and hence there are still many scientific uncertainties.

Whereas virologists and epidemiologists have been accepted immediately as important, trustworthy, and knowledgeable advisors by policy makers and the public when it comes to deciding about very substantial measures against corona, climate scientists seem to have a much harder stand. Is this likely to change in the future? Will the (successful) scientific response to corona elevate scientific advice also for climate change? Or are the immediate, individual threats of corona and the long-term, abstract dangers of climate change so different in their perception that communication and policy advice cannot be applied in a similar way?

The crises of corona and climate change are similar in yet another aspect, which is well known to scientists, but difficult for politics and society to handle: While the general nature of the threat is clear and undeniable, the devil is in the details: data is incomplete, different studies produce different results, with different consequences, and strategies deemed successful may seem ineffective in the light of new findings.

In the debate participants will discuss these aspects and try to define how climate change can be communicated most effectively.

Wednesday, 1 July 2020

Morning

Don´t Lecture Me!

Type

Video on Active Learning with Carl E. Wieman

 

Time

06.00 – 06.30 CEST, 30 min

Don´t Lecture me! in Lindau Mediatheque

Women in Science

Type

Debate

 

Time

06.30 – 08.00 CEST, 90 min

Women in Scienc in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Elizabeth H. Blackburn, Professor Emeritus of Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at University of California, San Francisco, USA
  • Maria Leptin, Director of European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO), Germany
  • Ruchira Mishra, Department of Physical Sciences at Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, India
  • Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, Max Planck Institute for Development Biology, Germany
  • Cora Uhlemann, Lecturer at School of Mathematics, Statistics & Physics at Newcastle University, United Kingdom
  • Moderator: Ingrid Wünning Tschol, Senior Vice President Future Issues and Foundation Development of Robert Bosch Stiftung, Germany

Abstract

“Clearly, women remain under-represented among Nobel Laureates, particularly in the sciences. Fortunately, some positive changes are afoot. The organizations in charge of the science prizes — the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm — have started to alter their nomination processes to support gender diversity. In the last 16 years, eleven women were honoured with the Nobel Prize in the scientific fields, which is one more than the entire first century of the award’s history. If taken as a trend, the next 100 years should see the addition of many more female scientists to the distinguished list of Laureates.”, writes Meeri Kim in her essay about “Nobel Women”, which is very worth reading.
Looking at this example, has the turnaround already been achieved, and time will do the rest anyway? This panel will discuss the role of women in science today – also outside the Nobel sphere –, which changes still need to happen, and how.

Starting Careers

Type

Debate

 

Time

08.00 – 09.30 CEST, 90 min

Starting Careers in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • J. Georg Bednorz, IBM Fellow Emeritus at IBM Research GmbH, Switzerland
  • Serge Haroche, Professor Emeritus at Collège de France, France
  • Sir Konstantin S. Novoselov, Department of Materials Science & Engineering at University of Manchester, United Kingdom
  • Amy Shepherd, Postdoctoral researcher at Boston Children’s Hospital, USA
  • Lillian Tugume, Makerere University College of Health Sciences School of Medicine, Uganda
  • Moderator: Alaina G. Levine, President of Quantum Success Solutions, USA

Abstract

A career in science, possibly in an academic position, is the dream of many young scientists. Yet it is widely known that academia itself needs only about 5% of the students it educates to fill open positions. That leads to two big questions: How to become one of the 5%? And: What will the remaining 95% do?

On their way, young scientists naturally encounter questions concerning how scientific excellence is achieved and evaluated by peers. Being at an age when starting a family, pursuing a career in science and striving for a healthy work-life balance is often experienced as stressful, if not frustrating. Moreover, in academic positions, one is often additionally burdened with funding problems, teaching duties and heavy administrative tasks, which make a successful career in academic science a complex and often wearing process.

But there are also many opportunities outside the academic world: A lot of research, for example, is done in industry. Yet many fear a certain lack of academic freedom when being part of a product and profit strategy of a major company. One option that combines both would be to become an entrepreneur early on and found your own start-up, which once again comes with its very own challenges: Funding, business logic, media scrutiny, to name a few.

Or how about: Science journalist, data analyst, policy advisor, youtuber, or teacher?

“Careers” has been a long-running issue discussed in many Lindau panel debates; this time, the participants will focus on academic and non-academic career paths for scientists, and show what alternative paths are available.

 

Academic Partners Expo & Networking

Type

Expo & Networking

 

Time

09.30 – 10.30 CEST, 60 min

Academic Partners

  • Columbus Association
  • German Academic Exchange Service
  • National Research Foundation, Singapore

Midday

Next Gen Science V

Type

Next Gen Science

 

Time

10.30 – 11.30 CEST, 60 min

Next Gen Science Session V in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Michael Grau, Physics, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Germany (10.30 – 10.45 CEST)
  • Ozge Karayel, Biology, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Germany (10.45 – 11.00 CEST)
  • Steffen Bruenle, Biology, Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland (11.00 – 11.15 CEST)
  • Daniel Reiche, Physics, Max-Born-Institut (MBI) im Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V., Germany (11.15 – 11.30 CEST)

Abstract Titles

  • Michael Grau: Revealing nonlinear signatures of interactions in high-dimensional tumor measurements and beyond
  • Ozge Karayel: Accurate MS-based Rab10 phosphorylation stoichiometry determination as readout for LRRK2 activity in Parkinson’s disease
  • Steffen Bruenle: Structural Basis for Allosteric Ligand Recognition in the Human CC Chemokine Receptor 7
  • Daniel Reiche: Try to picture the vacuum
Sciathon Results III

Type

Sciathon Results

 

Time

11.30 – 12.30 CEST, 60 min

Presentation of Sciathon Results for Lindau Guidelines in Lindau Mediatheque.

 

Participants

Team member of the top three ranked projects of the Sciathon concerning the topic Lindau Guidelines: Group Clifton, Group Elmiger, Group Mărgineanu

 

Topic

Lindau Guidelines

Next Gen Science VI

Type

Next Gen Science

 

Time

12.30 – 13.30 CEST, 60 min

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Anuvab Das, Chemistry, Texas A&M University, USA (12.30 – 12.45 CEST)
  • Karina Pombo-Garcia, Chemistry, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics, Germany (12.45 – 13.00 CEST)
  • Lorenz Adlung, Biology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel (13.00 – 13.15 CEST)
  • Marios Kidonakis, Chemistry, University of Crete, Greece (13.15 – 13.30 CEST)

Abstract Titles

  • Anuvab Das: Structural Characterization of Reactive Metal Nitrenoid Intermediates using Photocrystallography
  • Karina Pombop-Garcia: Spatiotemporal map of the tight junction formation during epithelial tissue polarization
  • Lorenz Adlung: fatbook & obese-IT: Systems biology towards discoveries in adipose tissue
  • Marios Kidonakis: Activation of Interelement Si-H, Si-B and B-B σ Bonds by Au Nanoparticles: The Midas Touch

 

 

 

Next Gen Expo & Networking

Type

Expo & Networking

 

Time

13.30 – 14.30 CEST, 60 min

Afternoon

The Impact of COVID-19 on Children

Type

Talk

 

Time

14.30 – 15.30 CEST, 60 min

The Impact of COVID-19 on Children in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Kailash SatyarthiKailash Satyarthi Children’s Foundation, India
  • Karan Khemka, Director of Global Education Companies and Institutions, United Kingdom and Singapore

 

Abstract

COVID-19 has exacerbated pre-existing inequalities in our world. While this virus does not differentiate between nationalities, religions or cultures, it is most adversely impacting those who are already marginalized due to lockdown restrictions and its aftermath. As restrictions are lifted in countries, children will be trafficked, forced out of school and into labour, bearing the burden of sustaining their families. With more than 90% of the world’s student population out of school due to school closures (at its peak), child marriage rates are also anticipated to increase. These children are also missing out on school meals. Pre-pandemic, nearly one in every five children worldwide lived on under $2 a day. In June, the World Bank estimated that COVID-19 will push 71 million people into extreme poverty in 2020.

A Scientist‘s Life

Type

Conversation

 

Time

15.30 – 16.30 CEST, 60 min

A Scientist’s Life in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Edmond H. Fischer, Professor Emeritus of Department of Biochemistry at University of Washington, USA
  • Countess Bettina Bernadotte, President of the Council for the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

 

Lindau Guidelines

Type

Debate

 

Time

16.30 – 18.00 CEST, 90 min

Lindau Guidelines in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

  • Elizabeth H. BlackburnProfessor Emeritus of Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics at University of California, San Francisco, USA
  • Martin Chalfie, Department of Biological Sciences at Columbia University, USA
  • Tanmoy Laskar, University of Bath, United Kingdom
  • William E. Moerner, Department of Chemistry at Stanford University, USA
  • Liubov Poshyvailo, Postdoctoral researcher at Institute of Bio- and Geosciences: Agrosphere (IBG-3) at Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany
  • Moderator: Karan Khemka, Director of Global Education Companies and Institutions, United Kingdom & Singapore

Abstract

The Lindau Guidelines 2020 are based on an initiative first introduced by Elizabeth Blackburn during the 68th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting held in Lindau two years ago.

She called upon the 600 young scientists in the audience to develop and support a new approach for global, sustainable and cooperative open science. While it was formulated with basic research as its primary focus, its principles and goals can be applied to all types and disciplines of science.

This initiative was met with very positive feedback from the audience and was discussed widely during the remainder of the meeting. Based on this, Elizabeth Blackburn and the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings started to explore what such a project would encompass and how to bring it to fruition. As the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings focus on young scientists at all stages of academic training as well as early-career scientists, the idea emerged of developing helpful and practical guidelines for scientific research and conduct that will support global, sustainable and cooperative open science in the long-term.

The guidelines, while intended for all those engaged in scientific research, are especially important for those embarking on independent careers. Their goals are to inspire and foster exchange of information and to raise awareness about the impact of their research and the need for collaborative efforts to sustain public support for science. They also respond to the current emergence of distrust of science in significant parts of the public in many parts of the world. Furthermore, public opinion and scientific consensus increasingly diverge drastically, with probably very serious consequences for humankind.

The participants in this debate will discuss the goals formulated in the guidelines and in particular, how they can be applied practically.

A Time of Lethal Ambiguities

Type

Literature Lecture

 

Time

18.00 – 18.40 CEST, 40 min

A Time of Lethal Ambiguities in Lindau Mediatheque

 

Participants

Panellists:

Goodbye

Time

18.40 – 18.55 CEST, 15 min